Standard Post with Image

Utilizing Undisturbed Areas in Stormwater Management

The preservation of undisturbed natural areas, as well as using them as buffers, is a principle that can be utilized.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Stormwater Management Feature Location Considerations

There are considerations that need to be made for a stormwater management plan, such as the best locations for your stormwater management features. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Permeable Pavement for Stormwater and Rain

Permeable pavement, also referred to as porous concrete or pervious concrete, is a highly porous pavement that allows rainwater to pass through it and soak into the ground beneath it. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Stormwater or Rainwater Art

Stormwater management is not always pretty. In fact, many times, drainage ditches, culverts, and black pipes can be an eyesore. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Impact Design Requirements of LID Stormwater Management

The main goal of low-impact design strategies is to distribute or scatter stormwater and urban runoff across developed sites.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Bioretention Basins and Retaining Ponds for Stormwater

Bioretention basins are another low-impact development strategy. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Catch Basins for Stormwater

A catch basin, also known as a storm drain, is used to redirect water to prevent flooding. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Water Harvesting Stormwater

Water harvesting, a LID strategy, is the collection and storage of rainwater.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

What are Disconnected Downspouts?

Downspout disconnection is a LID strategy that separates roof downspouts from their previous normal route – a piped system that enters the sanitary sewer system and/or discharges it onto impervious surfaces.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Rain Gardens and Bioretention Areas

A rain garden, one example of a low-impact development strategy, is a planted shallow depression (the catchment area). 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Stormwater Use for Green Roofs / Vegetated Rooftops / Living Roof

A green roof, a low impact development (LID) strategy, is an alternate roof surface that is partially or completely covered with vegetation. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Low-Impact Development Stormwater Management Strategies

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the term low impact development refers to “systems and practices that use or mimic natural processes that result in the infiltration, evapotranspiration or use of stormwater in order to protect water quality and associated aquatic habitat.”  

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Stormwater Management in Urban Settings

Historically, stormwater strategies have included methods to collect, store and move runoff away from urban environments into nearby waterways to prevent flooding in the cities.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

What are Floodplains?

Floodplains vary in size and consist of the floodway -- the main channel of the river or stream -- and the flood fringe which extends from the outer banks of the floodway to the enclosing valley walls.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Managing Stormwater in the City

Although cities afford untold opportunities to the human race, the development that goes with them tends to cause problems when it comes to runoff management. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

What is Stormwater Management?

Stormwater runoff is generated when natural precipitation – rain, snow, ice melt, etc. – does not initially infiltrate/percolate into the ground. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Stormwater Conservation Landscaping

One example of a LID strategy, termed conservation landscaping, preserves native species and provides wildlife habitat while also improving water quality. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Refurbishing Damaged and Old Catch Basins

Catch basins are often replaced every decade or so in busy areas where storm water systems take a lot of heavy use. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Preventing Seepage in a Catch Basin

Catch basins are prone to the water loss known as seepage just like many concrete lined water features. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Direct Connection to Local Waterways for Stormwater

Municipalities with natural or manmade waterways offer convenient opportunities for dealing with stormwater. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Maintenance Requirements for Storm Water Catch Basins

Even the best designed catch basins need regular maintenance to work properly. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Designing Better Catch Basins

When you go the extra mile to build a catch basin from scratch, you’ll want to address the specific shortcomings of most precast models.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Components of the Catch Basin

Despite being just a small part of the larger storm water management plan, the catch basin itself is complex enough to contain multiple important parts.

Read More
Standard Post with Image

Where Do Catch Basins Fit into a Storm Water Management System?

While catch basins are essential for capturing debris and consolidating surface runoff, they’re just one part of a much larger system. 

Read More
Standard Post with Image

The Challenges of Storm Water Management

Storm water is often treated as a nuisance rather than an important resource. 

Read More