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Plant Your Filtration Area in a Natural Swimming Pond

After installing your liner and filling your pond, it’s time to add your filtration plants. 

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Controlling Algae Growth in a Natural Swimming Pond

Algae is one of the most discouraging parts of natural pond ownership. It’s a natural and inevitable part of a pond’s life cycle, but it’s also unpleasant to swim through and can seem impossible to eliminate. 

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Dealing with Wildlife Attracted to the Pond

A well-built natural pond will attract a wide variety of wildlife. 

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The 50/50 Rules of Designing a Natural Swimming Pond

Natural ponds that aren’t used for swimming can be planted as heavily or lightly as you like. However, swimming ponds need a specific amount of planted and clear areas. 

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Building Entrances and Exits to a Natural Swimming Pond

Walking in and out of the pond through a random part of the pond bank may work if you only plan to swim a few times over the course of the summer. 

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To Add Fish or Not to Natural Swimming Pond?

For some homeowners, the idea of adding koi or goldfish to their backyard pond is even more of a goal than swimming.

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Choose a Natural Swimming Pond Style

All natural ponds need banks that look natural and stabilize the soil below the surface to prevent erosion. 

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Reasons to Choose a Natural Swimming Pond Over a Traditional Pool

Since building a natural pond for any purpose is a large home improvement project, you’ll want to make sure it’s the right choice for you before you begin. 

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Making a Natural Pond for Swimming

There are as many reasons for building a natural pond and there are designs and options for customization. 

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Controlling Access, Evaporation Rate, and Stormwater Gain

For many decorative and recreational ponds, gaining some water during rainy seasons and losing a few inches during a hot summer has relatively little overall effect.

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