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Finding a Water Supply for a Man-Made Lake

Man-made lakes are generally designed to stay at least partially filled all year round. 

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The Importance of Professional Engineering for Man-Made Lakes

Unlike backyard ponds and small decorative water features, man-made lakes are not something you can really DIY. 

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What Can Man-Made Lakes Provide?

Man-made lakes around the world are utilized for gathering, using, and controlling water. 

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Local and Federal Regulations for Retention Ponds

Retention ponds are important projects that require planning and approval from multiple agencies on the federal and state levels. 

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Managing and Removing Silt and Debris in Retention Ponds

Retention ponds need cleaning and plant trimming every few months, but they also need a full dredging for silt removal at least once every year. 

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Planted vs Concrete Ponds in Retention Ponds

Water and flood-tolerant plants are one of the best tools for building a retention pond that effectively processes storm water and enriches the local environment. 

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Lining a Retention Pond the Right Way

Storm water retention requires runoff is held for a specific period of time, to give sediment a chance to settle. 

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Designing Better Retention Ponds

Hydrology is the science of modeling water flow and volume to correctly size storm water features like retention ponds. 

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Potential Environmental Impacts of Retention Ponds

Any pond you add to a natural or developed landscape should enrich the ecosystem by treating runoff and offering a habitat for wildlife. 

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Retention vs Detention Ponds

It’s easy to confuse retention ponds for detention ponds or basins when you’re exploring storm water management options. 

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The Basics of Retention Ponds

Retention ponds are often as simple as holes dug in low lying dirt areas but can also reach high levels of complexity with multiple compartments, advanced filtration systems, and extensive overtopping protection for floods. 

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Protecting Fish from Predators and Self-Feeding

Fish fry are a primary food source for a wide range of amphibians, insects, animals, and even the fish themselves.

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The Question of Fertilization and Other Treatments for a Nursery Pond

Fertilizer is generally thought of as something limited to use on land. However, nursery ponds for raising fry and fingerlings are fertilized prior to the addition of new fish.

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Feeding Fry to Fingerling Stages of Growth

Feeding fry properly is the single most challenging part of running a nursery pond. Fry are not easy to feed, and even a steady supply of phytoplankton and other tiny lifeforms can suddenly disappear overnight or fail to keep them thriving.

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Which Liner Material is Right for a Nursery Pond?

Don’t underestimate the number of options you have for lining a nursery pond, even after you decide you want a flexible geomembrane.

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Liners to Prevent Water Loss in Nursery Ponds

While few fish pond owners would try to building rearing or feed-out ponds without a solid liner, these materials are also needed for nursery ponds.

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Flow and Water Change Requirements for Nursery Ponds

Like all fish rearing ponds, nursery ponds require a steady supply of conditioned fresh water and routine water changes.

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Letting Nursery Ponds Dry Between Seasonal Uses

Traditional use of open nursery ponds involved drying out the pond at the end of the season.

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Nursery Requirements for Specific Species of Fish

Nursery ponds are used for many different types of fish who need an open environment with a natural food supply and high water quality.

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How Nursery Ponds Work

Nursery ponds are a subset of rearing ponds that house fish during the most delicate and difficult stages of growth.

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Connecting Algae Ponds Directly to Aquaculture

For a food production system creating both vegetable and animal proteins at once, try combining an algaculture setup with an aquaculture business. Growing feed for the fish or crustaceans on-site greatly reduces

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What’s Needed for Rapid Algae Growth?

Algae doesn’t need the same water quality or conditions that plants and fish require. However, each species still has a set of conditions needed for rapid growth and profitable harvests.

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Risks of Algaecide from Liner Materials

Before you install any old pond liner you can find in your new algae ponds, check out the material. Many pond liners, even those that are fish-safe and plant-safe, feature algaecide treatments to control the growth of these tiny plants.

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The Importance of Pond Liners for an Algae Pond

Pond liners aren’t optional for algae ponds. While you may be able to grow fish or plants in mud-bottomed or clay-lined ponds, this won’t work for commercial algae production.

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Designing Open Algae Ponds

It’s not enough to simply dig a pond, fill it with water, and sprinkle in an algae sample. Open ponds used for algaculture need constant water mixing, the appropriate depth, and accurate projections of the water evaporation and loss rates.

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